ARC REVIEW : THE SECOND CHANCE SUPPER CLUB

Two estranged sisters reunite in an emotional novel of family, forgiveness, lost hope, and new beginnings.

They had a forever bond, until a sudden tragedy thrust them apart. Now, each at a crossroad in her own life, two sisters’ paths are about to intersect.

Broadcast journalist Julia Frank has it all: a career, an ambitious fiancé, and the hard-won respect of her peers. Until a ruinous decision destroys her reputation, puts her job at risk, and sends her reeling toward the only soul left to turn to: her estranged sister, Ginny.

The owner of a clandestine supper club hidden in the Arizona desert, Ginny Frank has a lot on her plate. The last thing she wants is more drama—or the burden of nursing her younger sister’s wounded ego. But family is family. Besides, Ginny can use the help in more ways than one, and she’s going to make sure Julia pulls her weight.

As a tenuous reunion reopens old wounds, Julia and Ginny have no choice but to confront the pain and betrayals of the past. Will working to keep the secret supper club running be just what they need to find common ground and a path toward forgiveness, or will the increasing stress push them even further apart?

review

I love stories about family and sisters. But it’s difficult to like the story when I can’t like either of the sisters and bring myself to care for them.

We start off with broadcast journalist Julia who’s overslept and has to rush to catch her morning news broadcast. She’s already in hot waters from her boss because of the low ratings.

Now, here was my first problem with the story. When her boss calls her to express displeasure about her not garnering enough ratings, she’s confused because she’s doing her job of what’s asked her. So she doesn’t get why she’d have to care about the ratings. Now, I could expect an inexperienced girl in her 20s to think like that. But Julia who’s apparently experienced and worked hard to reach this position, acting like that just didn’t sit well with me.

Julia acts like this confused, naive and pushover girl for the rest of the story. After she impulsively acts on a gossip she heard on a party and asks the mayor who’s guesting on the show thanks to her co-host about it. She’s of course suspended. And the first thing she does is leave the city and goes to her sister in Arizona without letting her know beforehand because she needs to escape, without having her husband know. And she justifies that having called her sister Ginny ONLY TWICE and not getting a response means she can just drop uninvited on her doorsteps. It’s the same sister who she apparently hasn’t had contact with in 3 years. Then she spends rest of the book ignoring the problem she left over at her job.

Ginny, on the other hand, is a divorced single mother. She had to pack everything up and leave her job as a premium chef in New York after her parents died. Julia who we now know to always escape her problems, refused to leave her important job  and stayed behind. That left the elder sister Ginny with a lot of bitterness about having been the one to sacrifice. She now runs a clandestine supper club at her own house with the help of her daughter who hates her and is closer to the dad.

I found Ginny even more unlikable than Julia. She’s unapologetically bitter and cold. I get that she’s having money problems, and is just not happy with her life, but the way she treated Julia and her daughter, just got on my nerves.

The only character I liked even a little was Olive. While I like character driven stories, I could not relate or empathize with any of the characters. Besides, it was very slow. Nothing seems to ever happen. This was a letdown because I genuinely liked the previous book of the author.


review

★★☆☆☆


Publication Date: 10th September, 2019.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)

Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository


3 thoughts on “ARC REVIEW : THE SECOND CHANCE SUPPER CLUB

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s