TOP TEN TUESDAY : THOUGHT PROVOKING BOOK QUOTES

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

The topic this week is top ten inspirational or thought provoking quotes. Here we go –


 

“If you want to know what a man’s like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

“It’s funny how you can forget everything except people loving you. Maybe that’s why humans find it so hard getting over love affairs. It’s not the pain they’re getting over, it’s the love.”
“Wishes don’t just come true. They’re only the target you paint around what you want. You still have to hit the bull’s-eye yourself.”
“And apologies, once postponed, become harder and harder to make, and finally impossible.”
“Anyhow, I’ve learned one thing now. You only really get to know people when you’ve had a jolly good row with them. Then and then only can you judge their true characters!”
 “We accept the love we think we deserve.”
I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself.”
“I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.”
Emma
“I had absolutely no interest in being somebody else’s muse.
I am not a muse.
I am the somebody.
End of fucking story.”
“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic. Capable of both inflicting injury, and remedying it.”

ARC REVIEW : THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

In the early 2000s, a string of abductions rocked the small upstate town of Reine, New York. Only one girl survived: Alex Salerno. The killer, Ken Parsons, was sent away. Life returned to normal. No more girls would have to die. Until another one did.

It’s been twelve years since Kira Shanks was reported missing and presumed dead. Alex Salerno has been living in New York City, piecemealing paychecks to earn a livable wage, trying to forget those three days locked underground and her affair with Sean Riley, the married detective who rescued her. When Noah Lee, hometown reporter with a journalistic pedigree, requests an interview, Alex returns to Reine and Riley, reopening old wounds. What begins as a Q&A for a newspaper article soon turns into an opportunity for money, closure and—justice. The disappearance of Kira Shanks has long been hung on Benny Brudzienski, a hulking man-child who is currently a brain-addled guest at the Galloway State Mental Hospital. But after Alex reconnects with ex-classmates and frenemies, doubts are cast on that guilt. Alex is drawn into a dangerous game of show and tell in an insular town where everyone has a secret to hide. And as more details emerge about the night Kira Shanks went missing, Alex discovers there are some willing to kill to protect the horrific truth.

review

Alex is the girl that got away from being a victim of a serial killer. She was abducted by the killer but got rescued before she could be raped and killed like the previous victims of the killer. She moved away from her small town soon after the incident, after another girl – Kira Shanks – went missing and Alex became old news. She’s now back for what she thinks is a legit interview but turns out to be wild-goose chase by a lazy college student for a paper about Kira Shanks’ case.

This student claims that the guy caught for killing Kira Shanks is pretending to be mute and mentally unstable just to escape punishment. He also tells Alex that detective Riley, the same guy who had rescued Alex is trying to get Kira’s apparent Killer Benny saved. Alex who had an affair with the much older and married Riley after he rescued her when she was 17, gets the excuse to meet the guy again. She admits to still having feelings for him. But he is dismissive of her and that spurs Alex to dig up the truth.

Alex is a mess. She tends bars, walks dogs and sells pills for a living. Even therapy didn’t help her. She’s also very erratic, impulsive and unpredictable. Her motives for investingating the Kira Shanks case all by herself were shaky at best. At first, it looks like she just wants to reunite her ex-lover. Then she claims that she’s doing it for the money offered to her. Detective Riley takes her to the mental facility Benny is living in to meet him. She’s indignant that a criminal gets to live in a facility akin to a hotel. But a few pages later she talks about how looking into Benny’s eyes made her feel that he was innocent.

Honestly, even though Alex’s character kept giving me whiplash, and was treating other characters with disdain, I still felt for her. She was like a wary stray puppy to me who just needed some affection.

It was the storytelling, fast pace and the plotting that made it a very enjoyable thriller to me. The author kept it realistic.

The environment the author created was made for a perfect thriller. I didnt know what to expect. Even the ending was bittersweet. But I finally read a psychological thriller and mystery that kept me on my toes after a long time. I believe that it would make a great film adaptation!


review

★★★★★

Publication Date: 3rd December, 2018.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)

Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository

BOOK REVIEW : THE FLATSHARE

Tiffy and Leon share a flat
Tiffy and Leon share a bed
Tiffy and Leon have never met…

Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they’re crazy, but it’s the perfect solution: Leon occupies the one-bed flat while Tiffy’s at work in the day, and she has the run of the place the rest of the time.

But with obsessive ex-boyfriends, demanding clients at work, wrongly imprisoned brothers and, of course, the fact that they still haven’t met yet, they’re about to discover that if you want the perfect home you need to throw the rulebook out the window…

reviewIt’s like I ordered what I thought would be a vanilla ice-cream, but with every bite, I was surprised with the burst of the myriad of other flavors that just had me going in for more.

Tiffy’s on-and-off boyfriend asks her to move out of his flat and she needs a housing option ASAP. Leon needs quick money to pay for his brother appeal case after he is wrongly convicted on a false robbery case. He works night shifts at a hospice and Tiffy is an assistant editor for a publishing house which publishes DIY and crafting books. (How cute is that?) So, both are desperate for money. Leon puts up an ad for a flatshare, and Tiffy answers. It’s convenient for both of them.

Almost half of the book is spent with Leon and Tiffy communicating through notes left at their flat, and the occasional texts. It also doesn’t help that Leon’s protective girlfriend takes the responsibility of dealing all things flatsharing with Tiffy, and it’s her house Leon spends his weekends in.

Leon and Tiffy are completely opposites. Tiffy is also quirky, messy, unreserved and warm. She also stands out because of her quirky sense of dressing. Tiffy also shares everything about her life with her best friends. Leon is the introvert. Quiet, shy and reserved. He doesn’t like talking.

Even the chapters with his POV are written in phrases rather than sentences to show his reticence with using words. In contrast, Tiffy’s POV chapters are wordier and more articulately written to keep with her chatty personality. It was a clever if unconventional style of writing by the author to paint the differences between the two characters.

But Leon and Tiffy are similar in the ways that count. They are both kind and compassionate. Leon is too attached to his patients, so much so, that he goes out of his way to help find their lost companions. When Tiffy finds out about Leon’s brother, she goes out of her way to help. A gesture that means a lot to Leon who needs people to believe in his brother’s innocence like he does.

A special shout-out to Tiffy’s friends! They were the whole package. Gerty was the pragmatic, no-bullshit lawyer friend, Mo sensitive and supportive, Rachel wild and fun-loving. I want them as my friends! This book also deals with the dangers of toxic and emotionally abusive relationships. I was just glad that Tiffy had the best set of friends to get her through her rough times. She also couldn’t ask for a better guy than Leon to help her move on. They were too sweet and adorable together. Almost too good for the world!

This was just the read I needed! There is a sweetness and depth to this book that was was not alluded to in the blurb. I couldn’t recommend it enough!


review

★★★★★


 

TOP TEN TUESDAY : FIRST 10 BOOKS I REVIEWED FOR MY BLOG

Happy Tuesday, people! Top Ten Tuesday is hosted over at That Artsy Reader Girl. And the topic this week is the first 10 books I reviewed. I’ve never really reviewed seriously before starting this blog. So here are the first 10 books I reviewed for this blog –

ttt

Transcend

The first of a duology with a reincarnation twist. There were 3 primary characters who all made my heart all achy.

My Rating : ★★★★★

 (Goodreads)

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

Not So Nice Guy

A friends-to-lovers romance with enough fluff and sweetness to give you diabetes. If you’re in mood for a light and cute romance, this is it for you.

My rating: ★★★☆☆

(Goodreads)

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

The Simple Wild

An atmospheric book that made me feel part of the world. At the center of it is a girl’s journey of self-discovery and the theme of family.

My rating: ★★★★★

(Goodreads)

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

Magic Triumphs (Kate Daniels #10)

The finale to my favorite Urban Fantasy series. Kate Daniels remains at the top of my list of favorite badass heroines.

My Rating: ★★★★☆

(Goodreads)

 

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

 

Epoch (Transcend #2)

An emotional conclusion to the beautiful story we saw start in Transcend. The 3 characters in this book are very close to my heart.
Interesting fact – The covers photos of both the books actually have a role to play in the book.

My Rating: ★★★★☆

(Goodreads)

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

Letters to the Lost

A heavy read on two characters who are dealing with grief in different ways and connect through letters left on a graveyard. I feel that the depth of this book was plagued by some cliches. The romance was minimal too. But it’s got a beautiful message about how first impressions can be wrong.

My Rating: ★★★☆☆

(Goodreads)

– – – – – – – – – – –

Good Luck With That

A beautiful read about friendship, addiction, self harm, obesity, mental illness and the importance of self-love.

It is not an easy read. But it has some meaningful messages that I feel we all need in our lives.

My Rating: ★★★★☆

(Goodreads)

 

– – – – – – – – – – –

Josh & Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating

One of my all-time favorite friends-to-lovers romances. It’s got an amazingly quirky heroine who is not afraid to be herself. It’s also got a Korean hero. *Swoon*

Worth a read if you like friends-to-lovers trope.

My Rating: ★★★★☆

(Goodreads)

– – – – – – – – – – –

The Girl Made of Clay

A woman who has always had to look after herself is now now has an added responsibility to look after her estranged musician father after he is injured. Things are not all good with her pilot husband flying away frequently too. The father-daughter relationship was my favorite part of this book.

My Rating: ★★★☆☆

(Goodreads)

– – – – – – – – – – –

Sadie

Perhaps my favorite crime-suspense-mystery of last year. A very difficult read about a teenager on the run to find the man behind her younger sister’s death.

My Rating: ★★★★★

(Goodreads)

 


It was great revisiting the books I reviewed at the beginning of my blogging journey! ^_^

QOTW 1 : QUOTE(S) OF THE WEEK : LOVE, WAR & LONELINESS

So, my internship and finals are over! Huzzah! That means I got to pick up my reading pace! Aaand I got to read three 5-star books over the past week. I’m on a roll, y’all!

I’ve also decided to start listing my favorite quote(s) of my reads over the week from now on. There have been too many instances when I’d come across a quote that I’ll love but then later forget what exactly it was or which book it belonged to. And that’s just too frustrating! So I intend to make sure to bookmark these quotes from now on. And what better way to do that than making a weekly blog post about it?

I just hope I can stick to it!


Untitled

 

“Let them start their dreadful wars, let destruction rain down, and let plague sweep through, but I will still be here, doing my work, holding humankind together with love like this.”

 

 

 

 

‘You feel lonely sometimes?’ Always, she wants to say. Worse is when she feels lonely in the company of others.

 

 

 

 

 


While the first quote made me stop a second and actually feel the depth in it, the second one had me feeling sad and just relate to it in a whole another level.

Also, can I just say that I’ve been such a big fan of Melina Marchetta for the longest time, that I would probably read a manual on drying paint by her. So when That Place in Dalhousie wrecked me, I’d been ready for it.

But Julie Berry completely bowled me over with her writing in Lovely War. She’s done an incredible job with this book! Definitely one of the best reads of 2019 for me.

It was totally uncalled me to be emotionally wrecked by two books in the same week! Do make sure to send some love in the way of these two books.


BOOK REVIEW : LOVELY WAR

A sweeping, multi-layered romance with a divine twist, by the Printz Honor-winning author of The Passion of Dolssa, set in the perilous days of World Wars I and II.

It’s 1917, and World War I is at its zenith when Hazel and James first catch sight of each other at a London party. She’s a shy and talented pianist; he’s a newly minted soldier with dreams of becoming an architect. When they fall in love, it’s immediate and deep—and cut short when James is shipped off to the killing fields.

Aubrey Edwards is also headed toward the trenches. A gifted musician who’s played Carnegie Hall, he’s a member of the 15th New York Infantry, an all-African-American regiment being sent to Europe to help end the Great War. Love is the last thing on his mind. But that’s before he meets Colette Fournier, a Belgian chanteuse who’s already survived unspeakable tragedy at the hands of the Germans.

Thirty years after these four lovers’ fates collide, the Greek goddess Aphrodite tells their stories to her husband, Hephaestus, and her lover, Ares, in a luxe Manhattan hotel room at the height of World War II. She seeks to answer the age-old question: Why are Love and War eternally drawn to one another? But her quest for a conclusion that will satisfy her jealous husband uncovers a multi-threaded tale of prejudice, trauma, and music and reveals that War is no match for the power of Love.


review

It’s 1942 when Aphrodite narrates the two love stories – with help – to her husband Hephaestus and lover Ares, as an example of how immortals simply cannot love the way mortals do. Let’s talk about the two love stories separately.

James & Hazel – It’s 1917. James meets Hazel in London a week before he’s about to enlist in world war I and there are sparks right away. Both of them are starry eyed teenagers, wholesome and innocent. What follows is a an adorable courtship! But there’s angst too. The well-mannered and honorable James is turned into a ruthless sniper by the war while Hazel joins YMCA as a musician to contribute however she can. The way both of these characters are forced to grow up and change over time was both heartening and heartbreaking to see. Their story had oodles of cuteness, romance and just the right amount of angst. Also, Hazel might be my favorite character in this book.

Collette & Aubrey – Collette is a Belgian who joined the YMCA after losing her  family and her beau in an attack on her hometown. Aubrey is part of an All-Black American troop serving in France. She has the loveliest voice and he is a self-proclaimed Jazz king. I loved how Aubrey is the cocksure and yet refined complement to Collette’s cool aloof self. My heart ached as much for Collette who has lost everything to the war as it did for Aubrey who has the hardest time as a black soldier. But when together, my heart couldn’t handle their cuteness!

I was charmed by both these couples. Even though, James and Hazel’s romance just felt a little more well-developed to me, I swooned right along with Aphrodite equally over James and Aubrey. The author succeeded in making me root for both these couples. I wanted them to have their happy endings!

But this book isn’t only about the romance. I loved the friendship between Collette and Hazel. I was heartbroken by the blatant racism the black soldiers had to face, and how hard it was for Collette and Aubrey to find acceptance as an interracial couple. This book also deals with mental illness, depression and death.

It’s always great to find a story with a well-developed plot and consistent characterization, but then the author had to add Greek mythology to bind together the whole thing and that makes for brilliant story-telling!


review

★★★★★


 

ARC REVIEW : A LILY IN THE LIGHT

A harrowing debut novel of a tragic disappearance and one sister’s journey through the trauma that has shaped her life.
For eleven-year-old Esme, ballet is everything—until her four-year-old sister, Lily, vanishes without a trace and nothing is certain anymore. People Esme has known her whole life suddenly become suspects, each new one hitting closer to home than the last.

Unable to cope, Esme escapes the nightmare that is her new reality when she receives an invitation to join an elite ballet academy in San Francisco. Desperate to leave behind her chaotic, broken family and the mystery surrounding Lily’s disappearance, Esme accepts.

Eight years later, Esme is up for her big break: her first principal role in Paris. But a call from her older sister shatters the protective world she has built for herself, forcing her to revisit the tragedy she’s run from for so long. Will her family finally have the answers they’ve been waiting for? And can Esme confront the pain that shaped her childhood, or will the darkness follow her into the spotlight?


review

Esme is the third of four children. She’s 13 when her younger sister Lily disappears right from their house, with everyone but their mother present in their house during the time. This disappearance leaves behind despair and guilt. Esme’s mother blames her father. The police initially have the eldest of the siblings, Nick, the 17 year old deadbeat brother. Madeline, the second sister feels guilty for the last words she said to the 4 year old Lily was that they were better of without her. Esme, who was the closest to Lily feels her own guilt for putting off Lily’s request for a story because of an exam the next day, and not going to comfort her when Madeline said those harsh words.

Lily’s disappearance leaves her family damaged. Cerise is obsessed with finding her daughter, and can’t forgive Andre for letting Lily disappear in his presence. Cerise also is not above pointing fingers at her son. Even Esme and Madeline can’t help but be suspicious of him. This creates a distance between Nick and the others. Cerise is ready to do anything to find her daughter, even if it involves taking help from a psychic or hiring a private investigator. Amidst all this, Esme is intent on not letting it break her, choosing to believe that Lily would be back. She feels the distance with her family, more than ever. Her only solace is in ballet. She also has her mentor Amelia and eventually a close friend Adam to lean back on, while keeping her family at bay.

The complexities in the relationship between the family members, due to the tragedy and the feelings of mistrust it creates among them, were beautifully conveyed. It was heartbreaking to see the distance between these characters, when it was clear that there still was love beneath it all. The characters were sketched such that all of them had their own voice. I just wish that we could see a little more before the ending. I also would have liked seeing Lily’s POV. But other than that, it was a great book, with a well-executed plot and strong characterization.


review

★★★


Publication Date: 1st April, 2019.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)

Links – Amazon| Goodreads | Book Depository

BOOK REVIEW : THE PLACE ON DALHOUSIE

‘You look the type to break your father’s heart.’
‘Yeah, but he broke mine first.’

When Rosie Gennaro first meets Jimmy Hailler, she has walked away from life in Sydney, leaving behind the place on Dalhousie that her father, Seb, painstakingly rebuilt for his family but never saw completed. Two years later, Rosie returns to the house and living there is Martha, whom Seb Gennaro married less than a year after the death of Rosie’s mother. Martha is struggling to fulfil Seb’s dream, while Rosie is coming to terms with new responsibilities. And so begins a stand-off between two women who refuse to move out of the home they both lay claim to.

As the battle lines are drawn, Jimmy Hailler re-enters Rosie’s life. Having always watched other families from the perimeters, he’s now grappling, heartbreakingly, with forming one of his own . . .

An unforgettable story about losing love and finding love; about the interconnectedness of lives and the true nature of belonging, from one of our most acclaimed writers.


review

Melina Marchetta has a distinct style of writing that when you read it, you just somehow know that it’s her. She can also evoke emotions effortlessly through her writing. Her stories also mostly always explore themes of family, particularly that of parents and children. There’s never only one primary plot line or one character arc that gets all the importance. There will be concurrent plot lines and characters, all connected with each other. The Place on Dalhousie is no different. We get to see the story from the perspective of three characters – the free spirited Jim, the rebellious Rosie and her step-mother Martha.

There is a lot going on with a lot of characters. Rosie is struggling with her parenthood and keeping her dreams on hold. She also has to share the house her father Seb built for her and her mother with her stepmother. But Martha and Rosie have a connection beyond this. Both their mothers lost their lives in the same week at the same cancer ward to breast cancer. Jim is struggling with his discovery of being a father all of a sudden, and laying roots when he never has before,  having been abandoned by both his parents. Martha is struggling with her grief for her husband, her love for the house he left behind and the potential of something more with friend’s elder brother Ewan who himself is struggling with a father who has Alzheimer’s.

There are appearances from characters from Melina’s previous books Saving Francesca and Piper’s Son, which all featured characters from Jim’s group of friends. I have a soft spot for this band of misfits. It was great to revisit them. Their friendship plays a big part in this book also. One thing I love about Melina’s books is that although there a lot of characters, each of them have a unique equation with another. She’s never lazy with her world-building. Here also, that is the case. All the characters are respectfully dealt with. Every line gives you a peak into a dimension. No words are wasted. I kept wishing for this book to never end. But it did. And now I don’t know how long I have to wait for another book by the author.


review

★★★★★


Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository

 

ARC REVIEW : I AM FINE AND NEITHER ARE YOU

Honesty is the best policy…except maybe when it comes to marriage in this brilliant novel about the high price of perfection from bestselling author Camille Pagán.

Wife. Mother. Breadwinner. Penelope Ruiz-Kar is doing it all—and barely keeping it together. Meanwhile, her best friend, Jenny Sweet, appears to be sailing through life. As close as the two women are, Jenny’s passionate marriage, pristine house, and ultra-polite child stand in stark contrast to Penelope’s underemployed husband, Sanjay, their unruly brood, and the daily grind she calls a career.

Then a shocking tragedy reveals that Jenny’s life is far from perfect. Reeling, Penelope vows to stop keeping the peace and finally deal with the issues in her relationship. So she and Sanjay agree to a radical proposal: both will write a list of changes they want each other to make—then commit to complete and total honesty.

What seems like a smart idea quickly spirals out of control, revealing new rifts and even deeper secrets. As Penelope stares down the possible implosion of her marriage, she must ask herself: When it comes to love, is honesty really the best policy?


review

Penelope has got a lot on her plate. She’s the primary breadwinner of her family, with her husband mostly working for home as a writer with a sporadic income. She also has to take care of the little needs of her two kids, from making their lunch to taking them to camp. Her husband, although well-meaning, has started to fee like third child to her. She’s not happy with her life – not her job and not the present state of her marriage.

Her whole life is shaken when her best friend Jennie dies of an overdose of pain pills. She finds out that Jennie and Matt who she found to be the perfect couple actually had a lot of problems. It’s a shock to her because she shared all the little details of her life with Jennie, but had no idea about Jennie’s problems. That’s all it takes for Penny to take things on her hand and bring changes to her marriage before her life can head to the same end as Jennie’s. Little does she know that these changes will force her to face her own demons and come to terms with some harsh truths.

This was a poignant story about marriage. Penny and Sanjay are two realistic characters. It was quite amazing to see the love between these two and the trust they had in their own love for the other. Penny is the girl who always says “Everything’s fine” and doesn’t like to share if she’s having a hard time. Sanjay is a great guy who got complacent for a while but is loyal and committed to his family. I really liked him. They work well as a couple. This book had a great message that although honesty and honest communication can be a bit rough at the beginning, but it is effective in fixing the problems.

A really good read about happiness and honesty, and the thin line between marriage, family and friendship.


review

★★★★★


Publication Date: 1st April, 2019.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)

Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository


 

ARC REVIEW : HAVE YOU SEEN LUIS VELEZ

From New York Times bestselling author Catherine Ryan Hyde comes a moving novel about two strangers who find that kindness is a powerful antidote to fear.

Raymond Jaffe feels like he doesn’t belong. Not with his mother’s new family. Not as a weekend guest with his father and his father’s wife. Not at school, where he’s an outcast. After his best friend moves away, Raymond has only two real connections: to the feral cat he’s tamed and to a blind ninety-two-year-old woman in his building who’s introduced herself with a curious question: Have you seen Luis Velez?

Mildred Gutermann, a German Jew who narrowly escaped the Holocaust, has been alone since her caretaker disappeared. She turns to Raymond for help, and as he tries to track Luis down, a deep and unexpected friendship blossoms between the two.

Despondent at the loss of Luis, Mildred isolates herself further from a neighborhood devolving into bigotry and fear. Determined not to let her give up, Raymond helps her see that for every terrible act the world delivers, there is a mirror image of deep kindness, and Mildred helps Raymond see that there’s hope if you have someone to hold on to.


review

A beautiful coming-of-age story that has some heartwarming lessons.

Raymond Jaffe is a black kid who lives with his mother, step-father and three half-sisters, all of them white. He doesn’t feel that he belongs. It also doesn’t help that his mother has no time to listen to him. He sees his father – who is black – on the weekends. Although his dad is good at listening, he’s not good at talking. His stepmother also makes Raymond feel very unwelcome. To make matters worse, Raymond’s only friend moves to a different state at the very beginning of the book. This is a character that deserves all your hugs. You will begin to care for him within the first couple of pages.

Things take a turn when he is the only person in his building who does not ignore a blind elderly woman standing outside her flat, waiting for something. Millie is helpless after Luis Velez who appointed himself her unofficial caretaker, disappeared. Millie who hasn’t ventured out of her house all by herself in a long time, is out of money and food. Raymond initially helps Millie out of kindness, but it takes no time for them to build a bond. He also takes on the mission to find Luis Velez, even if he has to go meet all the guys with this name in the city. But finding Luis proves only to be the beginning of the story.

Raymond is a character that you can’t help but love. He’s endearing, adorable and cute. He’s also lost and starved for affection. So when Millie and Raymond find each other, it’s the best thing that could happen to both of them. Their bond was just too beautiful. And I loved how Raymond finally finds someone to confide in. It was absolutely heartening to see this boy learn so much about the world in the things he does just for Millie. Then later, when Millie is the one who’s depressed and in despair, it’s Raymond who tries to show her through his actions that there’s so much to appreciate in the world.

This book deals with very important issues like racism, sexuality, depression, prejudice and prejudice. I love that we see Raymond learn about the complexities of human behavior through his experiences, and evolves as a character, without losing the goodness in him. This story and specifically Raymond will stay with me for a long time.


review

★★★★★


Publication Date: 21st May, 2019.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)

Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository