TOP TEN TUESDAY : FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2019

I was going to do a similar post on my own about this anyway, but since it gels with the weekly TOP TEN TUESDAY, all the better! What better way to wrap up the year? I’ll talk about my favorite releases from 2019 here only.

Doing a TTT after what feels ages. It’s good to be slowing finding my blogging foot back.


The Beantown Girls | Jane Healey

I was lucky enough to get an ARC of this gem of a book. Three friends join as volunteers in Red Cross Clubmobile girls during World War II. My favorite thing about this book is probably the female friendships. But it’s also about courage and love.

You can find my review here.

 

Have You Seen Luis Velez? | Catherine Ryan Hyde

Another ARC that I loved. An uplifting and heartwarming coming-of-age story about a black teenager living with his white mother and her family from her second marriage to a white guy. He finally finds a sense of belonging when he meets his ninety-two year old neighbor, and sets out on a mission to help her. It’s wonderfully written and impossible to dislike.

You can find my review here.

 

The Bride Test | Helen Hoang

A beautiful love story between two very different individuals. I liked this one a lot more than its predecessor. It could be because both the main characters are Asian, or that they are equally flawed. Or it could be just because they’re both adorable and fleshed out really well.

You can find my review here.

 

The Place in Dalhousie | Melina Marchetta

This particular story is about Jimmy Haller coming home, Rosie – the mother of his child, and Rosie’s step mother Martha. It’s about how these people figure out their lives and their complicated relationships. And Melina Marchetta can write about dysfunctional families like nobody else.

You can find my review here.

 

Love From A to Z | S. K. Ali

This book explores many themes that I hold close to my heart –  Islam, migrant condition workers in the middle east, feminism, and love. And the author does full justice to it.

You can find my review here.

 

Lovely War | Julie Berry

This book is narrated by Greek Gods and intertwines two love stories set in World War I. Really, what’s not to love?

You can find my review here.

 

Daisy Jones & the Six | Taylor Jenkins Reid

A book narrated in forms of interviews where the characters look back on the rise and fall of an iconic band. This book was too real and raw for my heart. Taylor Jenkins Reid sure knows how to write strong women.

You can find my review here.

 

The First Girl Child | Amy Harmon

 A book about Nordic kings, runes, curses and magic. It’s a masterpiece, is what it is. If you haven’t read Amy Harmon, you’ve made a mistake. Easily my top 3 of the year.

You can find my review here.

 

Ninth House | Leigh Bardugo

The best writing of the year for me. There are a lot of polarizing reviews on this. Yes, the beginning does not make it easy, nor do the triggers. But the story only gets better from there.  I absolutely loved the writing, the plot and the characters in this world about ghosts, magic, portals and whatnot.

You can find my review here.

 

Bringing Down the Duke | Evie Dunmore

Hands down my most favorite romance of the year. This book almost reads like a modern romance, with its incorporation of the suffrage movement. What’s not to like about this book? Sizzling chemistry. Just the perfect amount of angst. Women fighting for their rights. A progressive hero. Relatable heroine. Compelling backdrops.

You can find my review here.


So, these are my favorites of 2019. I can’t wait to read the lists of everyone else and see if there are any matches!

QOTW 1 : QUOTE(S) OF THE WEEK : LOVE, WAR & LONELINESS

So, my internship and finals are over! Huzzah! That means I got to pick up my reading pace! Aaand I got to read three 5-star books over the past week. I’m on a roll, y’all!

I’ve also decided to start listing my favorite quote(s) of my reads over the week from now on. There have been too many instances when I’d come across a quote that I’ll love but then later forget what exactly it was or which book it belonged to. And that’s just too frustrating! So I intend to make sure to bookmark these quotes from now on. And what better way to do that than making a weekly blog post about it?

I just hope I can stick to it!


Untitled

 

“Let them start their dreadful wars, let destruction rain down, and let plague sweep through, but I will still be here, doing my work, holding humankind together with love like this.”

 

 

 

 

‘You feel lonely sometimes?’ Always, she wants to say. Worse is when she feels lonely in the company of others.

 

 

 

 

 


While the first quote made me stop a second and actually feel the depth in it, the second one had me feeling sad and just relate to it in a whole another level.

Also, can I just say that I’ve been such a big fan of Melina Marchetta for the longest time, that I would probably read a manual on drying paint by her. So when That Place in Dalhousie wrecked me, I’d been ready for it.

But Julie Berry completely bowled me over with her writing in Lovely War. She’s done an incredible job with this book! Definitely one of the best reads of 2019 for me.

It was totally uncalled me to be emotionally wrecked by two books in the same week! Do make sure to send some love in the way of these two books.


BOOK REVIEW : THE PLACE ON DALHOUSIE

‘You look the type to break your father’s heart.’
‘Yeah, but he broke mine first.’

When Rosie Gennaro first meets Jimmy Hailler, she has walked away from life in Sydney, leaving behind the place on Dalhousie that her father, Seb, painstakingly rebuilt for his family but never saw completed. Two years later, Rosie returns to the house and living there is Martha, whom Seb Gennaro married less than a year after the death of Rosie’s mother. Martha is struggling to fulfil Seb’s dream, while Rosie is coming to terms with new responsibilities. And so begins a stand-off between two women who refuse to move out of the home they both lay claim to.

As the battle lines are drawn, Jimmy Hailler re-enters Rosie’s life. Having always watched other families from the perimeters, he’s now grappling, heartbreakingly, with forming one of his own . . .

An unforgettable story about losing love and finding love; about the interconnectedness of lives and the true nature of belonging, from one of our most acclaimed writers.


review

Melina Marchetta has a distinct style of writing that when you read it, you just somehow know that it’s her. She can also evoke emotions effortlessly through her writing. Her stories also mostly always explore themes of family, particularly that of parents and children. There’s never only one primary plot line or one character arc that gets all the importance. There will be concurrent plot lines and characters, all connected with each other. The Place on Dalhousie is no different. We get to see the story from the perspective of three characters – the free spirited Jim, the rebellious Rosie and her step-mother Martha.

There is a lot going on with a lot of characters. Rosie is struggling with her parenthood and keeping her dreams on hold. She also has to share the house her father Seb built for her and her mother with her stepmother. But Martha and Rosie have a connection beyond this. Both their mothers lost their lives in the same week at the same cancer ward to breast cancer. Jim is struggling with his discovery of being a father all of a sudden, and laying roots when he never has before,  having been abandoned by both his parents. Martha is struggling with her grief for her husband, her love for the house he left behind and the potential of something more with friend’s elder brother Ewan who himself is struggling with a father who has Alzheimer’s.

There are appearances from characters from Melina’s previous books Saving Francesca and Piper’s Son, which all featured characters from Jim’s group of friends. I have a soft spot for this band of misfits. It was great to revisit them. Their friendship plays a big part in this book also. One thing I love about Melina’s books is that although there a lot of characters, each of them have a unique equation with another. She’s never lazy with her world-building. Here also, that is the case. All the characters are respectfully dealt with. Every line gives you a peak into a dimension. No words are wasted. I kept wishing for this book to never end. But it did. And now I don’t know how long I have to wait for another book by the author.


review

★★★★★


Links – Amazon | Goodreads | Book Depository

 

TOP TEN TUESDAY : The Ten Most Recent Additions to My TBR List

Hello all! Back with another TTT entry for another week. I’ll just name the most recent entries to my TBR based on my Goodreads Want-To-Read list.

Top Ten Tuesday is a blog meme hosted by the awesome That Artsy Reader Girl.


ttt

What The Wind Knows 

Amy Harmon is one of my top favorite contemporary authors. And I absolutely loved the last historical fiction she wrote – From Sand And Ash. She’s a master at creating a mood in her books. This one’s a time-travel fantasy set in the Ireland of 1921. I can’t wait to get my hands on this one!

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 


The Place On Dalhousie

I could write essays on how much I love Melina Marchetta, okay? History suggests that if I read a book written by her, I’m bound to love it. I’ve been waiting for this book since I read the short story When Rosie Met Jim which is sort of a prologue to this book back in 2017. This book couldn’t come soon enough.

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 


Circe

I love Greek Mythology, retellings and strong women. This book happens to have all of them. Need I say more?

 

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 

 


The Poppy War

I found out about this book a little later than I’d have liked thanks to a friend’s review of it on Goodreads. The premise, the genre and the word-of-mouth – everything about this book compelled me to add it to my TBR.

 

Goodreads Link – here.

 


The Unhoneymooners

Two words. Christina Lauren.

A wedding? The bridesmaid and the best man? Hijacking a honeymoon? A lie about being married?

Gimme already!

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 

The Girl He Used To Know

This is one of the very first books I requested for in Netgalley… and got refused. So this was one of those cases of wanting what you can’t have (for the time being). And of course I love the sound of the book.

 

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 

We Came Here To Forget

The cover was the first thing that attracted me. The premise of a young olympic skier escaping to Argentina after losing everything and reinventing herself with a group of expats was what sold it for me.  Hoping that it will be a good one.

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 

 


The Vanishing Stair

I’ve just started Truly Devious. And I’m really liking it so far. So I just went ahead and added the sequel to my TBR. I’m hoping to love the series even more as I go ahead.

 

Goodreads Link – here.

 

 


The Beautiful

I can’t remember the last time I was this intrigued by the premise of a Young Adult with vampires. This one also happens to be a historical fiction. And this is Renée Ahdieh we’re talking about. Can you blame me for having high hopes?

 

 

Goodreads Link – here.


Park Avenue Summer

Mad Men meets Devil Wears Prada. This book promises an insider’s look at the rise of Helen Gurley Brown- the woman who changed the dynamics of what magazines would do as an editor-in-chief at Cosmopolitan – through the eyes of her assistant who I assume is fictional.

I’m really intrigued and excited by the sound of this book. Hope it won’t disappoint.

Goodreads Link – here.


This is it. Fingers crossed that these books live up to my expectations!
2019, please don’t let me down!