ARC Review : A Postmodern Love By Nick Totem

*I’d like to thank the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in return of an honest review.*


Have you ever fallen in love and then had not just your life but your conception of life altered forever? Come and find out more in A POSTMODERN LOVE, a contemporary adult novel–romance, noire, psychological suspense.

In the end, a man is shot through the heart. Another man is driven to the edge of madness. Caught between them is Lana Fauves, a beautiful, intelligent woman, but one who is haunted by her past and the loss of her true love, a musical genius. In this fast-paced novel—romance, thriller, and noire—Thomas Wilde, a doctor and veteran of the Iraq War, will stop at nothing to win over the woman he has desperately fallen in love with. But amid the machinations of the modern world, will he find true love, or only heartache, deception, and murder?


A Postmodern Love slowly snuck up on me.  The prologue packs quite a punch. But the story itself takes time to build. I had a difficult time investing myself at the initial parts before the story slowly wielded its magic and began to engage me.

Obsessive love was the main theme here. And the protagonist who’s the narrator of the book is an obsessive person by nature. He makes it clear in the very first few pages where he gets infatuated by Lana the minute he lays his eyes on her. He even talks about a girl he was obsessed about back in college.

Thomas Wilde is a doctor who also served in the Iraq war. He quite possibly suffers from PTSD as nightmares about one tragic event from his time there keeps haunting him regularly. But when he meets Lana, it’s her mysterious beauty that begins to haunt him.

Lana was the most fascinating character. She’s written as a Femme Fatale to the T. You don’t know what’s going through her mind right till the end. The author quite cleverly keeps the readers wondering about her just as the protagonist.

The on and off relationship between Lana and Thomas only helps to exacerbate his infatuation for her. There are genuine postmodern elements of relationships at work here. On one hand, you can see Thomas willingly let his blind love for Lana leading him towards a point of no return. On another hand, you actually witness how Lana plays him perfectly. I didn’t like any of the characters but they were all intriguing. There is a depth to this book that I particularly enjoyed.

On a side note, I was distracted by the many grammatical errors which I hope won’t be in the final version.

My inability to empathize with the main characters created an emotional disconnection in me. But I would still call this psychological thriller an absorbing piece of storytelling


My Rating: ★★★☆☆


Publication Date: 29th January, 2019.
Source: ARC from Publisher (via Netgalley)
You can find this book on – Goodreads | Amazon

Top Ten Tuesday : Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

Happy Tuesday, peeps! Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly blog meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. I like this week’s prompt – Longest Books I’ve Ever Read – a lot because I’ve read a number of long books in my days.

I’ve generally had positive experiences with long books. Well, if I start a long book and it doesn’t grab my interest at the beginning, I do have the bad habit of dropping it. But, even so, most lengthy books I’ve read actually rarely disappointed me as a whole.

I think there are a lot more 700 odd-pages books I’ve read but I have skimmed through parts of more of them than not. So, I’ll only talk about the books I’ve read without skimming.

P.S. I won’t specify the pages as different editions have different numbers of pages, I’ll just talk about the page-range based on the editions I own.


 1000-odd Pages

Lord Of The Rings | J. R.R. Tolkien : I have a humongous book with the compilation of the trilogy. It might be the largest book I own.

Gone With The Wind | Margaret Mitchell : I talked in previous post about what an emotionally draining this book was for me. It took me a week to finish it and another week to recover from it. I’d never felt this accomplished as a reader before this, and rightly so, because this is the lengthiest single book I’ve read. After reading this a second time a year later, I decided I was a masochist and never dared to read it again. It has a lot of themes and controversies, but it stands out to me as the the most cynical and yet one of the best romances I’ve read.

 800-odd Pages

  

Outlander | Diana Gabaldon : I’ll be honest with you. I don’t remember the details of the books. I know what happened as a major arc but the minor details evade me. And that’s because I only read this book one time. But I’ll admit that it’s more due to my own whims as a reader than the book itself.

Harry Potter and The Order Of The Phoenix | J. K. Rowling : Initially, this was my least favorite book of the Harry Potter series. But as I grew older and reread this a few more times, I learned to appreciate this book for what it was – a real gem. Suffice it to say, it’s no longer my least favorite. Not even close.

700 odd Pages


Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows | J. K. Rowling : I finished this book in one sitting. Took me probably 8/9 hours. Later I regretted having devoured it so fast and wished I would’ve taken more time to savor every line the first time I read them. Self-control has never been never my strong suit.

Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire | J. K. Rowling : For a long time, this was my favorite book of the series. Even more than Prisoner Of Azkaban. I remember reading this book during a blackout in candlelight and gasping out loud when Harry’s name was announced from the goblet. Ah, good times!

Angels & Demons | Dan Brown : There was an extraordinary buzz around this book when I read it. Everyone around me was declaring this the best book they’d read. While I liked it, I wasn’t blown away by it like the rest of the population. This always happens to me with books with such hype. I’m now more cautious with my expectations for books with praises all around.

Dragonfly In Amber | Diana Gabaldon : I read this book one time just like its predecessor. Gabaldon is a magnificent writer. I loved the series the first and only time I read it, (well, the first three books – I never read the rest of the series). I just think that it just requires a lot of energy and attention from the reader which I never felt like mustering a second time.

Court of Wings and Ruin | Sarah J. Mass : I absolutely loved this book when I first read it. I was aware of the flaws in the back of mind as I read through them but I didn’t mind them. I enjoyed and gobbled it up pretty fast for such a huge book.

Breaking Dawn | Stephenie Meyer : Such a mess. This book was like a horrible trainwreck I couldn’t take my eyes off. And that’s the only reason I could finish it. I don’t think I’ve read many worse conclusions to a trilogy than this.


I was surprised to discover while writing this post that books I thought were among my lengthiest reads – actually weren’t. Maybe it’s because of factors like font size, spacing and page sizes. Who knows? But this was fun!